Evangelism

Bevin Ginder Missionary To Cambodia On Evangelism, Discipleship, and Missions


Read Rough Copy Of Podcast Transcript Below

Paul J. Perkins:
Hey, I’m glad you tuned in. This is Paul Perkins and this is the Evangelism Press podcast. Today we’re going to be talking with Bevin Ginder who is a missionary in Cambodia. He works with YWAM at a mission outpost. They’re training local missionaries to go back out into their communities and society to reach more people for Christ. We’re going to be discussing today evangelism. We’re going to be discussing what conversion looks like, discipleship in Cambodia. Also for you guys that are into CrossFit, if you’re listening and you’re into CrossFit, you know exactly who you are, but if you’re into CrossFit, Bevin talks about CrossFit oddly enough in Cambodia as a possible missions outreach. So if you’re just tuning in, we’re glad to have you and we’re excited to talk about missions. Check out our website, evangelismpress.com and here’s the podcast. Later.

Paul J. Perkins:
Yeah, let’s get going here. Okay, Bevin Ginder. We’ve been friends for a few years, Bevin.

Bevin Ginder:
Yes, sir.

Paul J. Perkins:
You’re a missionary. Where are you a missionary at, Bevin?

Bevin Ginder:
We are working in Cambodia, which is in Southeast Asia and specifically in a city called Battambang, which is probably the third largest city in Cambodia, and working with an organization called Youth with a Mission. And they have a large campus there where they’re doing lots of mercy ministry evangelism and training stuff.

Paul J. Perkins:
Excellent. Hey, what time is it right now? What time is it where you are?

Bevin Ginder:
Where I’m at it’s 7:17.

Paul J. Perkins:
Oh wow.

Bevin Ginder:
In the morning.

Paul J. Perkins:
Bevin, this is a very, it may be a spiritual question to some of our listeners, but do they have Cocoa Puffs in Cambodia? What do you have for breakfast there in Cambodia?

Bevin Ginder:
In Cambodia, the best breakfast is called bai sach chrouk which is basically you get some rice with some pieces of pork on top and then some pickled vegetables and throw that down with some green tea. And it’s really good.

Paul J. Perkins:
That does sound good. Some good pork for breakfast. It sounds like it’s a breakfast of champions, so you get up in the morning, your typical day, I guess you’ve got regular family chores, and you’ve got a son to raise, a wife to love and take care of.

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah.

Paul J. Perkins:
What’s your day look like in the morning? I wasn’t planning on asking you this, but what does it look like in the morning time for you?

Bevin Ginder:
These days, I don’t know if it’s old age, I’m getting up quite early. So I have a good chunk of time just on my own. And then about 7:00 or so, my son wakes up. We have our family time and breakfast. And then 8:00, because we’re part of a community, we’re joining in with the whole community as we take care of our campus for half an hour or so. And then Judy is homeschooling and I go off to the office and I’m working on could be a number of different projects. Some of it is related to mobilizing more Cambodians into missions. And then often in the evening we have outreach stuff that we’re doing in in the city. But then by 4:00 my son and I are, we actually are trying to get in shape, so we do some CrossFit.

Paul J. Perkins:
Oh wow. So they have, they have CrossFit in Cambodia, huh?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah. It’s actually a business as mission initiative done by [inaudible 00:03:56]. So it’s a great place to connect with non nonbelievers and really build relationship.

Paul J. Perkins:
I’m glad you said that because here’s a lot of CrossFitters I’m friends with. I’m not a CrossFitter yet I guess. It’s a cult following. Is it a cult? Is Crossfit a cult in Cambodia or is it just good fun? I mean, tell me the truth, Bevin.

Bevin Ginder:
There are some guys that are really serious about it. They’re joining in with international competitions and competing and it’s they are really tough.

Paul J. Perkins:
I believe you, man. It’s serious too. If you talk to a CrossFitter, if you get some terminology wrong or you don’t have something right, they will let you know quick, will they not?

Bevin Ginder:
It’s true. It’s got its own lingo.

Paul J. Perkins:
So it’s pretty cool though. All right, so let’s just back up a minute. How did you, forgive my Southern slang here, but how did you wind up, what brought you, what was the call that brought you, I guess, to be a missionary to begin with? And you said you were involved in, we call it YWAM, but Youth with a Mission. How did you even get involved in that, Bevin? What was the start of all this in your life?

Bevin Ginder:
Well, for me, I did grow up in Zimbabwe, so I kind of grew up on the mission field as a missionary kid. But then when I came back to the US at age 11, for some reason I got listening to Keith Green, and he’s this very prophetic, very passionate Christian musician. And then he died in a small plane accident unexpectedly, tragically. But right before he passed away, he went on a missions trip and he got really aware that there’s like billions of people with no access to the gospel, and that really fired him up. And so he was all, Jesus commands us to go and really trying to mobilize people in admissions and Hey, I built relationship with YWAM specifically Loren Cunningham, the founder, and before he passed away. But then after he passed away, YWAM and his organization pulled together like a 70 city missions mobilization tour.

Bevin Ginder:
So I went to the concert there in Hershey park, Pennsylvania and I was right there listening to… They had played some footage of Keith Green’s concert and then he would introduce Loren Cunningham in the video, and then the real Loren Cunningham will walk out on stage and just invite everybody into missions. And I just kind of picture Revelation 7:9 and what it would be like to have a small part to play in one of those unreached people groups being there at the end of the story. And I was like, that would be a a worthy cause. And it kind of set me on a course. So I did survive college and then survived paying off college. And then about 10 years after that point, I was able to do my first introductory discipleship training school in YWAM. And I’ve been going since 1991 with YWAM.

Paul J. Perkins:
Interesting. Hey, how old were you when you went to that concert?

Bevin Ginder:
How old was I?

Paul J. Perkins:
Yeah. When you felt that initial call, how old were you then?

Bevin Ginder:
I don’t know. That would have been 19… I was born in ’64. That was ’81 or two, something like that.

Paul J. Perkins:
Wow.

Bevin Ginder:
I’m not so good at remembering.

Paul J. Perkins:
No, but quite young, man. I mean-

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah.

Paul J. Perkins:
It had an impression on you at an early age and so you could discern even then. You knew God was calling you into something, right?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah.

Paul J. Perkins:
And so it’s interesting you bring that up because a lot of times when people are talking about gospel calls, it’s hard to figure out what they’re talking about. And I hate to say it this way, for me or for you, for a lot of us, the call is the call to reach lost people. I’m not going to say I don’t believe in a general call. I don’t know what your take on this is, but I believe… We were just talking last Sunday about the Macedonian call and the man in Paul’s dream there at night was he called on Paul to come and help us.

Bevin Ginder:
Right.

Paul J. Perkins:
I think that’s a big part of calling. I see it in scripture time and time again, especially when you look in the Acts. I mean, he’s going to go help not only unreached people groups, but like you’re talking about, the people, just people. You’re going to help people with the gospel. That’s what that call was, that Macedonian call. And so even at a young age, that was kind of the call. It was as if they were crying out, “Come help us.” Right, Bevin?

Bevin Ginder:
Totally, totally. Jesus said, “As in the same way I was sent, I’m going to send you.” And Jesus definitely said, “I am here to seek and save the lost.” So, if we’re going to be calling ourselves followers of Jesus, we need to be doing what he was doing.

Paul J. Perkins:
Yeah, I think it’s interesting. You really brought that out just kind of struck me just at that early age. And I think many, if you begin to talk to pastors, many of their colleagues, we could get back to what initially got us into the ministry. I think a lot of the doubts and a lot of the indifference or I guess the willingness to give up, you go back and ask yourself, “Why did you begin?”

Bevin Ginder:
Right.

Paul J. Perkins:
And people are quitting for reasons that have nothing to do with why they started. You know what I mean?

Bevin Ginder:
Yes, yes. That’s so valuable to reevaluate. So what was the main thing? What is the main thing anyway?

Paul J. Perkins:
So I guess we can come back to that though. But that kind of spoke to me when you said that early age, this God speaking to you through lost people groups. But so-

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah.

Paul J. Perkins:
You’re there. We kind of got to cover some basics, but I want to hone in IN Cambodia, for our listeners, it’s hard for an American mind to wrap their minds around. They’re not there with you. They’re not having the same breakfast as you. They’re not walking through a normal day with you. It’s hard for us to wrap our minds around it. Let’s talk about conversion for a moment, which I guess conversion it’s sort of on the back burner in America in a certain sense. It’s not first and foremost anymore when you’re talking about church or church growth so much. We’re not talking about conversion sadly as much as we should be. But there, what does conversion look like here? In America, someone may get saved, they may get saved out of drug addiction or self-righteousness. Like all of humanity, we were saved from some dominant sin, and not just dominant sin, from original sin as you well know.

Paul J. Perkins:
But what does conversion look like? If you took, let’s say someone that was a 16-year-old teenage boy, he gets saved. What does that look like for him in Cambodia?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah. This is a culturally Buddhist context and so they’re growing up in a situation where this idol worship all around them and their families participating in it. And that’s the norm. And it’s mixed with animism, which basically means they are not just thinking about a purist Buddhist religion, but they’re afraid of spirits. They need to do the right thing, to give the right offerings, otherwise the spirits might harm them. So there’s a lot of fear that they’re coming out of. But also, for this young person that you would be thinking about here in this case study, they are in a context where a large majority of the educated and the older generation was wiped out by the Khmer Rouge which was this dictator who just massacred so many Cambodians, his own people.

Bevin Ginder:
And so the very young population, so they are also asking lots of questions about, what is important, how can I make life work, struggling with unemployment, trying to get an education. Then also the typical things that human beings deal with in terms of addiction. That’s definitely there. But yeah, I think the context that would be most different thinking about Cambodia versus North America would be thinking about a shame and fear culture that’s just steeped in idol worship and Buddhism and stuff like that.

Paul J. Perkins:
Interesting. So these teens too, you’re saying there’s not a lot of father figures, there’s not a-

Bevin Ginder:
Right.

Paul J. Perkins:
Is there grandparents there? Are they wiped out too?

Bevin Ginder:
Many of them wiped out. Many of them wiped out. So 70% of the of the population is under the age of 30. Very young population.

Paul J. Perkins:
So when they’re starting, they’re literally starting with no Christian heritage whatsoever.

Bevin Ginder:
Right.

Paul J. Perkins:
And you’re starting… Go ahead.

Bevin Ginder:
Just very little access to the Bible. Very little access to churches that would be in their language. Huge chunks of Cambodia that just have no opportunity to know about Jesus. That Christian heritage is definitely just not that there. And yet I would say that there’s really good signs of hope and kind of happy to say that YWAM had a part to play with it. Because when the Khmer Rouge was killing so many people, that many refugees came out to Thailand and there was this huge refugee camps in Thailand, YWAM heard from God to say, “We need to step up and do something.” And it was really the context where we figured out how to do mercy ministry.

Bevin Ginder:
So YWAM members came in and basically ran some of these refugee camps and many of the Khmer Cambodians became Christians. And then when that regime was over, those people went back all over Cambodia and basically jump-started the Body of Christ and it became one of the fastest growing churches in the world and has just not stopped growing. So that’s the good news. But yet still it’s a small percentage of the population.

Paul J. Perkins:
So as soon as they’re converted, what takes place? I’m kind of leaning in here on this question, but what takes place as soon as they’re converted? Immediately they’re evangelists to reach more of their fellow, let’s say if it’s a teenager or a 20-year-old or a 25-year-old immediately or they bring in more people? What does that look like for them? Or are they a little reluctant? How does that work, Bevin? Let’s say a this young man, this 16-year-old gets saved. Like in the Bible, like John 4, does he go and tell everyone in town exactly what Jesus did for him or is that dangerous? What is that like for them to tell people they’re saved or to be baptized? Is that a danger in Cambodia?

Bevin Ginder:
We’re so blessed in that at this season in Cambodia that is not a dangerous thing. So there’s two answers to your question. The first one is, it just seems that in the makeup of the Khmer people, they are natural evangelists. They’re just happy to and it just seemed like a no brainer. “Oh, I have this amazing experience and it’s changed my life” and they just start sharing that within their social networks. And yet the person, the discipler who brings them to Jesus, the evangelists who brings them to Jesus does have a key role in how that goes forward because of course there are people who would just say, “Okay, now that you know Jesus, you just need to learn a lot and come to class and sit in church.” But probably that’s not the majority of folks. At least in our context, we really understand that people when they receive something can then right away that week, that month start to be the messenger also to their sphere of influence.

Paul J. Perkins:
I’m taking notes here. One thing that just popped into mind. In a certain sense, you’re saying discipleship is sort of on the go.

Bevin Ginder:
Yes.

Paul J. Perkins:
It’s not like a… Like tease that out a little more because that is definitely alien thinking to the American mind. It shouldn’t be, but it is. Discipleship’s not just plugging it. Nothing wrong with Sunday school. Nothing wrong with small groups. Nothing wrong with these things or the educational.

Bevin Ginder:
No, nothing wrong with them.

Paul J. Perkins:
Nothing wrong with the educational process, but you’re saying as soon as they get saved, then they plug in or a truth they plug into a truth or God plugs into them, let’s say about baptism or let’s say about fuller knowledge of repentance or sanctification. Immediately they’re on the go to relay that information and share that information. Tease that out for me a little bit more.

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah, we’re just really convinced that that disciples shouldn’t just be learners that get a lot of information before they actually apply it but that a key because I think we’ve done a great job of giving lots of great information to lots of people, and then they just become people with lots of information in their brains. And so we’re like, how can we make sure that we as disciples are not just hearers of the Word, but doers and actually obey what Jesus taught.

Bevin Ginder:
And so that has to start right at the beginning. We’ve seen the best fruit is when that new disciple just thinks, “Hey, this is normal Christianity. Whatever I learned today, I’m going to share it with five people this week.” And then we come back together and say, “How did it go?” And kind of hold each other accountable to that, but that discipleship is kind of going to where people are at in their work, in their school, in their home, and then not just requiring everybody to come more to where we’re at to get more information.

Paul J. Perkins:
Do you think, Bevin, that a lot of folks that are scared to witness, let’s say in other context in other countries or that you’re not in, would you think that maybe we’re not trying to bag on people or anything, but we’re just trying to think about this because it’s kind of unfortunately it’s unique. I think it’s refreshing to hear what you’re saying about sort of this discipleship on the go. Do you think, let’s say 10 years in and a lot of countries that are not sharing the gospel and let’s say a pastor stands behind a pulpit in California or in North Carolina or Virginia or wherever and he says, “Hey, listen, we’re going to start an evangelism program,” which I think is a great thing, especially if you’re not involved in evangelism, but let’s say you’re at a church. The evangelism program begins. It didn’t previously exist. There’s a lot of fear there.

Paul J. Perkins:
But really if every Christian, if we could ever get the first generation used to this idea in any church, in any context, the moment you’re saved, you’re outfitted by God to spread the gospel.

Bevin Ginder:
Yes.

Paul J. Perkins:
It may not be perfect, but you’re not going after perfect. You’re going after a living witness. You’re going to be a living witness of the gospel. That muscle in a sense that spiritual muscle is just really in those 10 year old Christians, let’s say, that they are so afraid. It’s just underdeveloped. If we were to get to them let’s say the very beginning, they would never sort of develop lopsided that way where discipleship was just purely intellectual.

Bevin Ginder:
Yes.

Paul J. Perkins:
They would be able to develop that intellect along with the doing part of discipleship, right?

Bevin Ginder:
I see that, and I agree that those programs are useful and helpful to kind of jumpstart us, build that back into us. But it’s definitely harder 10 years down the road. And if it was 10 weeks down the road or 10 days down the road, man, they just grow up spiritually thinking, “Hey this is normal.” So then it’s part of the part of the DNA of the sea. So definitely for us as leaders thinking of how to shift corporate culture in our communities, this start young and start early, and then over time we’ll have a growing number of people who shift that corporate culture because it’s part of who they are rather than just a program.

Paul J. Perkins:
Do you think that matches up more with like the Book of Acts where it says that the Lord added to the number of disciples cycles daily? Do you think that’s what’s going on there with you?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah, I that’s what we’re inspired by for sure.

Paul J. Perkins:
Yeah. I think that’s something that’s definitely well-needed here, the recapture that I did. Okay, so you work there sort of at an outpost. What are you doing there? The sort of mission sending center. Just we touch on that for a moment and then I just got a few more things to comment on, and we’ll let you get back to your pork and bits, pork and rice. But at the the outreach center you’re working at there, what goes on there? Give us kind of a rundown of what’s taking place.

Bevin Ginder:
Well, there’s so many things that this particular… It’s a missions hub. It’s a university. It’s a community. They’ve got mercy ministries happening among children at risk and women at risk. They’ve got evangelism happening where they’re going out to the villages and doing church planting often, starting with working with kids and then reaching to the parents and finding men of peace that can take leadership in those communities. And they are also doing training. So people from the Body of Christ in Cambodia and even internationally coming to get trained as disciples get trained as missionaries. And then the thing that mobilized us to Cambodia was we were invited to help pioneer the first school of missions in Cambodia. And out of that school, three pioneering teams went and some of them went cross-culturally to do very important and sometimes restricted access nations, meaning they’re hard to harder to get into. And when we saw that we’re like, this is at the center of our vision as Bevin and Judy was to come alongside of the new missionaries. God is raising up from new sending nations.

Bevin Ginder:
And so there’s definitely so much to be done in Cambodia and yet they also read the same Bible. We read and they also have the same mandate we read and have. And they also have the same capacity and they just need those mentors and coaches to enable that. And it’s happening. And so when it started happening, meaning Cambodians going cross-culturally, they were like, “This has always been a part of our vision, but now now we have to kind of catch up with what God is doing.” So they invited us to come and help kind of build this pipeline of building relationship with the Body of Christ, the local church, and then inviting some of those people to come and get trained, those who are called to cross-culture missions to come and get trained and then to send them out and then to sustain them.

Bevin Ginder:
So the ongoing pastoral care. So mobilizing, equipping, sending and sustaining is the part of this mission’s hub that we’re hopefully helping to develop going forward so that in the long run we can not only see Cambodia reach, but also see Cambodia become a missionary sending nation. They’re saying, “Hey, we want to be the next South Korea.” South Korea was war torn after the war and very Buddhist, and yet when the missionaries went there, eventually the gospel took root and now South Korea is sending missionaries all across the world. So Cambodians and specifically YWAM members are like, “We want that for Cambodia.”

Paul J. Perkins:
So you have a lot of young men and young ladies. What’s your age group that want to be trained, want to be mobilized and go back out in their community as missionaries? What’s that age range there, Bevin?

Bevin Ginder:
Well we’ll take them at age 18 for the [inaudible 00:26:07] training school. But even younger than that, hundreds of them are coming everyday to what they call youth development center. So they’re learning English but they also have opportunities to do Bible studies and opportunities to hear the gospel from our teachers that are there. But I would say 18 on up.

Paul J. Perkins:
Eighteen and up.

Bevin Ginder:
Probably 18 to 30 is probably the vast majority.

Paul J. Perkins:
What kind of needs like resource wise does it take? I mean you guys are living… Are you living on campus or where are you living?

Bevin Ginder:
At this point, we are living on campus. Yeah.

Paul J. Perkins:
So you’re living on campus. You’ve probably got other folks I guess from around the world, Bevin? Or no or yes?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah, around the world. Some of them are from around the world. The majority are Cambodians, but some internationals like us.

Paul J. Perkins:
So you’re there on campus. And then resource wise, who pays for this stuff? I mean that wasn’t what I was planning on asking but it comes to mind. Who is footing the bill for the lunches, for the health care, you name it. Who’s footing the bill? Is it churches? Is it donors? I mean what does that look like? How do you raise funds for something like an outpost like that?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah, probably can be a long answer, but the short answer is that every individual there is responsible to build relationships with their friends and family and local churches and invite them to partner with them through prayer and finances to be able to keep going. For the Khmer, for these Cambodians, that’s a real challenge because of course the Body of Christ there, the local church there is not extensive or wealthy. And so they struggle to raise support and yet God does miracles time and time again as they are faithful to write the newsletters and invite people faithfully.

Bevin Ginder:
And then, but if for the whole campus, the campus director is now touring across the United States, inviting people to partner with them as a campus to do phase two of building some of these classrooms and meeting rooms that we’re hoping to fund for the next year. And then the third part is they actually have some folks who have started businesses as missions business as missions. So one is a really popular cafe that’s in town and the profits of that go to help support Cambodian missionaries. And also this CrossFit gym also is a business as mission initiative, thinking about how can we do business in a way that actually raises funds also?

Paul J. Perkins:
Now, that’s music. If you’re a Christian and you’re listening to this podcast and you’re a CrossFitter, that’s music to your ears, right, Bev?

Bevin Ginder:
Right.

Paul J. Perkins:
Because God can even call CrossFitters to the mission field, right? Yeah.

Bevin Ginder:
Totally.

Paul J. Perkins:
Which is amazing. Wouldn’t it be amazing? I know it is for somebody listening to have such a love of something like CrossFit and love the Lord and then God happened to call you to do CrossFit, Bevin, as your missionary endeavor to reach and support. It’s amazing the kind of stuff that God does, isn’t it?

Bevin Ginder:
I love it. And in my opinion, this is how we should be thinking about things, is that we have… I used to think that you have all of these different types of ministries out there that you could pick, and one of them might be evangelism and disciple making. And now I’ve totally reached shifted that. And I think that, okay, yeah, there’s all these different types of ministries you could pick, things you could do, but inside of every one of them you should have evangelism and disciple-making.

Bevin Ginder:
So it doesn’t matter if you’re a barista in a coffee or starting a coffee shop. Great. But in that context, what are you doing? What is your goal? How do you measure success? Well, it’s not just good coffee or running a great sports program or seeing women, give good deliveries of children. It’s also to then connect them to Jesus. Because those things are great, but only Jesus can change the heart from the inside out. And so that has to be integral to whatever type of ministry we can do. But the good news is that then whatever you are passionate about, that can be integrated in. I absolutely believe that.

Paul J. Perkins:
Yeah, that’s kind of a different slant. It’s not a slightly different slant than we see in the Bible really, but it’s a different slant than what we’re used to and it’s refreshing to hear that. And let me ask you one last crazy question. Okay. You ready?

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah.

Paul J. Perkins:
What is your favorite dish, your favorite meal in Cambodia? If you and Judy said, “Hey, tonight we’re having our favorite dish,” what is that going to be for you, Bevin Ginder?

Bevin Ginder:
Honestly, we found an Indian restaurant there that we like.

Paul J. Perkins:
Oh, man. This podcast will never see the light of day. In Cambodia, right, you found your favorite Indian restaurant there.

Bevin Ginder:
Yeah, but there’s one that’s called lok lak that’s really good. It’s kind of like a tender steak with a lot of pepper in it. And then they have a lot of great soups. These days a very popular dish is this [foreign language 00:32:02] which is like a spicy noodle and they have these restaurants popping up to say, “Okay, we’ve got seven levels of spiciness. How high can you go?” And I tried level two and I was about dying.

Paul J. Perkins:
Yes. Hey man, it’s been a joy to talk to you. If somebody wanted to support your family in missions financially and by prayer, how could they do that, Bevin?

Bevin Ginder:
They can go to the YWAM http://www.ywamcoloradosprings is that? I think it is. Oh, I don’t know the website.

Paul J. Perkins:
We’re going to put in the show notes on the website. You can send me a link afterwards. And we’ll hunt that down and we’ll get it up on the website. And if you could send us a link and I’ll put it also on the blog posts, the transcript of this website, Bevin, and we’ll get in there. Also something that was interesting you brought up as far as support is maybe that director that goes around and tries to raise funds for the facility itself.

Bevin Ginder:
Right, right.

Paul J. Perkins:
That’d be another really good link, would it not?

Bevin Ginder:
Oh totally. Totally. Yeah, they’ve done a great job with the latest video, kind of giving an overview of what God is doing through this ministry and then a very good invitation to partner with us.

Paul J. Perkins:
Bevin, we love you brother. We’re praying for you. And I hope if somebody listening that God has spoken, whether it be CrossFit or whatever walk of life they’re in, that God is speaking to them. Hey, could you close this in a prayer, Bevin, before we go?

Bevin Ginder:
Yes, I can. Thank you so much for this chance to chat with you about these things. Jesus, so kind to us. Never give up. Always just inviting and inviting us to partner with you to reach the lost. And we know that you love us. Yes, we’re at the center of your heart and yet you love the lost, and you would leave the 99 to go after that one. And we want to be like that. And so often we have understood and learned a lot and can give all the right answers, but we’re no longer satisfied with that. We want to be disciples who obey your commands, especially and including go make disciples of all nations. And would you help us to figure out how to do that in whatever context we find ourselves in. In Jesus name. Amen.

Paul J. Perkins:
Amen. Bevin, we love your brother. Have a good morning.

Bevin Ginder:
Thank you, Paul.

Paul J. Perkins:
Later.

Bevin Ginder:
See you.

Paul J. Perkins:
Hey, we’re glad you tuned in. And I’d say, hey, check us out again for some show notes. There should be a transcribed version of the podcast up on the website, evangelismpress.com. Have a great day. See ya.

To Support Bevin and his family, Click Here

To Support The Mission Send Center, Click Here

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s